Now with 17% less surliness

I had an irritatingly poor attitude yesterday that stood in the way of anything productive, digging its heels in and  braying angrily. A better night of sleep seems to have reduced this obstinacy, so I better squeeze in a post while I can. Be forewarned: I don’t have a theme or plan, so it’s going to ramble around.

First, the wife was right. Not that she isn’t usually right, with her common sense and general optimism, but she hit the nail on the head. She had been wondering the same thing that I had been, if all of these personal revelations I’ve been having are just symptoms of a mid-life crisis, so the title of the last post made her laugh. When we talked about it, she gave me a better explanation. What I’m going through right now is a sudden awareness of the things I could possibly achieve, and the opportunities that are out there for me. Most people have this kind of inspiration when they become adults, as they look at the choices of school and work with a lifetime ahead of them. At least, I hope most people have this feeling at some point, because it’s pretty cool. I just happen to be about a decade late,having spent my late teens and half of my twenties in a thick mental fog. With a lot of hard work and trial and error, the fog is pretty much lifted and I can dream of a future that extends past dinnertime.

Fun fact:most of Canada’s Prime Ministers assumed office around age 50, which means I have 14 years to become Prime Minister, if I want to. For the longest time I have bemoaned the years I lost to idleness and childish self-pity, but I’m now seeing just how much more time I have in front of me. It’s a lot. And instead of being afraid of the roadblocks and pitfalls that could happen and limiting my plans, I’m going to choose optimistic goals and roll with the punches.

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3 thoughts on “Now with 17% less surliness

  1. I can identify with your feeling of being late to the game; emerging from the teen and twenty-something fog. I had to decree better late than never to prevent getting pissy about the fog not clearing soon enough. For me, I had to figure out (still figuring out) that there is no crystal-clear approach to your declared end-goal. As long as I decide on the goal, and keep that in focus, a path will appear somehow by my volition or not (if I really want the goal bad enough). While you’re planning for tomorrow just never forget to live today, to live in This Moment. The only thing in our lives that we can truly call ours, is the very next second that’s coming.

  2. Good for you, Chris! I totally get what you’re saying. I have just worked out what I want to do when I grow-up (at *cough* years of age). Late to the party – nah. The party is just about to get started!

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